December 6, 2012

Gay Wash. couples get marriage licenses

By Thursday afternoon, more than 450 licenses had been issued in Seattle, where the mood was festive overnight. Because the state has a three-day waiting period, the earliest that weddings can take place is Sunday.

The Associated Press

SEATTLE  — Hundreds of same-sex couples across Washington state started picking up marriage licenses Thursday as a voter-approved law legalizing gay marriage took effect.

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Jessica Lee, left, 19, and Ashley Cavner, 21, of Vancouver, Wash. were the first in line in Clark County as marriage licenses for same-sex couples were issued for the first time in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 in Vancouver, Wash. Washington state now joins several other states that allow gay and lesbian couples to wed. Gov. Chris Gregoire signed a voter-approved law legalizing gay marriage. Because the state has a three-day waiting period, the earliest that weddings can take place is Sunday. (AP Photo/The Oregonian, Randy L. Rasmussen)

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Deb Dulaney, left, watches as her partner, Diane McGee, fills out paperwork for their marriage license at the Thurston County Auditor's office at the courthouse, on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, in Olympia, Wash. Washington state's new voter-approved gay marriage law took effect Thursday, and couples across the state began picking up licenses and can start marrying as soon as Sunday. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)

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King County, the state's largest, opened the doors to its auditor's office in Seattle just after midnight to start distributing licenses. But hundreds of people had lined up hours earlier, snaking around the building on a chilly December night. By Thursday afternoon, more than 450 licenses had been issued in Seattle, where the mood was festive overnight.

"We waited a long time. We've been together 35 years, never thinking we'd get a legal marriage. Now I feel so joyous I can't hardly stand it," said 85-year-old Pete-e Petersen, who with her partner, 77-year-old Jane Abbott Lighty, were the first to get a license.

After meeting 35 years ago on a blind date in Sacramento, Lighty and Petersen plan to get married Sunday. The couple has been out buying shoes and clothes for the wedding.

Washington state now joins several other states that allow gay and lesbian couples to wed. Gov. Chris Gregoire and Secretary of State Sam Reed certified the election results of Referendum 74 on Wednesday afternoon, and the law took effect at 12:01 a.m. Thursday.

R-74 had asked voters to either approve or reject the state law legalizing same-sex marriage that legislators passed earlier this year. That law was signed by Gregoire in February but was put on hold pending the outcome of the election. Nearly 54 percent of voters approved the measure.

The law doesn't require religious organizations or churches to marry gay or lesbian couples.

Because the state has a three-day waiting period, the earliest that weddings can take place is Sunday. Same-sex couples who previously were married in another state that allows gay marriage, like Massachusetts, will not have to get remarried in Washington state. Their marriages became valid here Thursday, when the law took effect.

Vicky Dalton, the Spokane County auditor, was designated as a point person for all of the counties preparing for same-sex marriage licenses. She said that as of 4 p.m. Thursday, more than 760 marriage licenses had been issued statewide to same-sex couples, with more than half of them being issued in King County.

At the Thurston County courthouse Thursday morning, Deb Dulaney, 54, and Diane McGee, 64, both of Olympia, arrived just before 9 a.m. The couple have been together for 16 years and moved to Washington state in 2005 from California, where they were registered as domestic partners.

McGee said they wanted to get married there but were unable to before voters passed 2008's Proposition 8, the amendment that outlawed gay marriage after it had been approved by court ruling. A federal court has since struck down Prop. 8, but an appeal on that case is still pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Dulaney and McGee registered as domestic partners in Seattle in 2005, and then through the state when the state's domestic partnership law passed in 2007. Now they wanted to take that final step of marriage. They haven't set a wedding date but said a simple service is planned within the 60 days that their license is valid.

"I feel much more moved by it than I thought I would," Dulaney said. "I thought we were just going to come here, get the paperwork and go home. But now, it's like, 'whoa.'"

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Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

Jeannine Godfrey, left, and Katharine Tossey, right, hold their marriage license at the Thurston County Courthouse on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, in Olympia, Wash. Washington state's new voter-approved gay marriage law took effect Thursday, and couples across the state began picking up licenses and can start marrying as soon as Sunday. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)

  


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