March 14, 2013

Inside the conclave: The making of a pope

BY RACHEL ZOLL Associated Press

VATICAN CITY -- Three rounds of ballots had been cast with no winner, but it was becoming clear which way this conclave was headed.

When the cardinals broke for lunch, Sean O'Malley of Boston sat down next to his Argentine friend, Jorge Bergoglio.

"He seemed very weighed down by what was happening," O'Malley said.

Hours later, the Buenos Aires archbishop would step before the frenzied masses packed into St. Peter's Square as Francis, the first pope from the Americas.

Cardinals take an oath of secrecy when they enter a conclave, promising never to reveal what goes on inside. But as is customary, the cardinals involved share memories of their experience.

Procession

It began Tuesday afternoon with a procession.

Reciting a hypnotic Gregorian chant, the 115 princes of the church, dressed in red robes over white lace tunics, filed two by two into the frescoed masterpiece that is the Sistine Chapel and took their seats at four rows of tables. One used a wheelchair and was helped to his place by his colleagues.

Then each man moved to the front and took an oath not to reveal what was about to occur: "We promise and swear not to break this secret in any way, either during or after the election of the new pontiff."

With a cry of "extra omnes" -- "all out" -- the massive double doors swung shut, the key was turned and the conclave was under way.

In the chapel

No matter how beautiful the chapel, Chicago Cardinal Francis George said, the acoustics aren't great.

The presiding cardinal, Giovanni Battista Re, had to explain each step in the ritual twice, once to each side of the room.

Other than that, there was only silence.

"The conclave is a very prayerful experience," O'Malley said. "It's like a retreat."

Each man wrote a few words in Latin on a piece of paper: "I elect as supreme pontiff..." followed by a name.

One by one, they held the paper aloft, placed it on a gold-and-silver saucer at the front of the room, and tipped it into an urn.

And then the tallying began, with three cardinals -- known as scrutineers -- reading out the name on each slip.

When they finished counting, it was clear the field remained wide open, said Cardinal Sean Brady, leader of the church in Ireland.

"There were a number of candidates," he said.

A cardinal threaded the ballots together and put them in a stove.

Outside in St. Peter's Square, as black smoke billowed from the chimney, the cheering crowd fell silent and began to thin.

Staying put

On Wednesday morning, the cardinals filed in again and repeated the ritual of voting.

Each man filled out his ballot and walked to the front of the room.

"When you walk up with the ballot in your hand and stand before the image of the Last Judgment, that is a great responsibility," O'Malley said.

There were two votes before lunch, and the field was narrowing.

But the smoke was black again, and the crowd was again disappointed.

This time, however, they didn't leave the square.

Serious stuff

At lunch, O'Malley sat down besides Bergoglio.

"He is very approachable, very friendly," he said. "He has a good sense of humor, he is very quick and a joy to be with."

But with the vote going his way, Bergoglio was uncharacteristically somber.

The magic number

In the first afternoon ballot, the cardinals were getting close to a decision. But not quite.

They started over, and the scrutineers read out the names.

And it began to dawn on the men that their work was done.

(Continued on page 2)

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