January 11, 2013

W.Va.'s Sen. Rockefeller won't seek re-election

The Associated Press

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, who came to West Virginia as a young man from one of the world's richest families to work on antipoverty programs and remained in the state to build a political legacy, announced Friday he will not seek a sixth term.

The 75-year-old Democrat's decision, coming at a time when his popularity in a conservative state had been waning for sparring with the powerful mining industry and supporting President Barack Obama, told The Associated Press ahead of his formal announcement that it was time to retire.

After about three decades in elective office, it was time to "bring more balance to my life after a career that has been so obsessively dominated by politics and public policy and campaigns," he said. "I've gotten way out of whack in terms of the time I should spend with my wife and my children and my grandchildren."

Rockefeller's retirement was widely expected and puts the seat held by Democrats since 1958 in jeopardy for the party. Within weeks of November's elections, Republican U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito vowed to run for the Senate seat in 2014, even if it meant going up against Rockefeller and his storied name. Other Republicans also have been eyeing the seat in recent weeks.

Democrats, who hold a 55-45 edge in the Senate, will be defending 20 seats in next year's election while Republicans have 13 seats on the ballot. Among the vulnerable Senate Democrats are Alaska's Mark Begich, Louisiana's Mary Landrieu and Arkansas' Mark Pryor, all in Republican-leaning states.

Rockefeller's retirement is the first of the 2014 class and comes early in the process, giving Democrats time to find a candidate.

Rockefeller said Capito's announcement did not influence his decision. Willing to devote millions of his personal wealth toward his campaigns — including several against Capito's father, ex-Gov. Arch Moore — the senator said he believes he would have prevailed over the seven-term congresswoman.

In a state that is the second-leading producer of coal, Rockefeller's positions rankled some who are protective of an industry that brings more than 65,000 jobs to one of the nation's poorest states. He accuses mining supporters of a combative closed-mindedness in the face of inexpensive natural gas, concerns over climate change and calls for cleaner ways to burn coal. Mining advocates accuse Rockefeller of abandoning them as Obama has ramped up scrutiny of Appalachian mountaintop-removal mining operations.

"I know the coal companies are going after me. ... I can live with that, because I know that I am fighting every day for coal miners," Rockefeller said.

Rockefeller defended his support of Obama and the president's signature health care overhaul, and insisted that their unpopularity with West Virginians did not influence his decision to retire.

"I'm proud of that work, and if people don't like it, the more it comes into effect the more they will understand that it's good," he said of the health care reform.

Rockefeller said the Senate achievement he is most proud of is the 1992 measure aimed at preserving retirement benefits for miners, their widows and children, which he credits for averting a national coal strike. He also has championed stricter coal dust limits in response to a rise in mining-related black lung disease and proposed increased safety measures after the 2010 Upper Big Branch mine disaster killed 29 West Virginians.

Other top issues he has had a hand shaping include child welfare, cybersecurity and foreign trade. He chairs the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and previously served at the helms of Intelligence and Veterans' Affairs. He co-sponsored legislation creating the states-level Children's Health Insurance Program, and helped persuade the U.S. Veterans Affairs Department to revisit disability claims arising from what has become known as "Gulf War Illness."

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