December 19, 2013

Oil trains raise concerns in small towns, cities

Fears are stoked by the July crash in Lac Megantic, but a review shows the number of accidents has remained steady and most involve small quantities of oil.

By Matthew Brown And Josh Funk
The Associated Press

WOLF POINT, Mont. – It’s tough to miss the trains hauling crude oil out of the Northern Plains. They are growing more frequent by the day, mile-long processions of black tank cars that rumble through wheat fields and towns, along rivers and national parks.

click image to enlarge

A BNSF Railway train hauls crude oil west of Wolf Point, Mont. As common as the mile-long trains have become across the U.S. and Canada, dozens of officials in the towns and cities where they travel say they are concerned they are not adequately prepared to handle an emergency.

The Associated Press

click image to enlarge

Chris Dschaak, a volunteer firefighter in Roosevelt County, Mont., and mayor-elect of the town of Wolf Point, talks about concerns over oil trains passing through his community. Dschaak says the fire department’s limited supply of specialized foam to fight oil fires, stored in the barrels to the left, would be quickly exhausted by a major oil train accident.

The Associated Press

As common as they have become across the U.S. and Canada, officials in dozens of towns and cities where the oil trains travel say they are concerned with the possibility of a major derailment, spill or explosion, while their level of preparation varies widely.

Stoking those fears was the July crash of a crude train from the Bakken oil patch in Lac Megantic, Quebec – not far from the Maine border – that killed 47 people. A Nov. 8 train derailment in rural Alabama where several oil cars exploded reinforced them.

“It’s a grave concern,” said Dan Sietsema, the emergency coordinator in northeastern Montana’s Roosevelt County, where oil trains now pass regularly through the county seat of Wolf Point. “It has the ability to wipe out a town like Wolf Point.”

The number of carloads hauled by U.S. railroads has surged in recent years, from 10,840 in 2009 to a projected 400,000 this year.

Despite the increase, the rate of accidents has stayed relatively steady. An Associated Press review of federal hazardous material accident records show most of those incidents involved small quantities of oil.

Railroads say 99.997 percent of hazardous materials shipments reach destinations safely. Representatives said they work hard to prevent accidents and make sure emergency responders are prepared, by training about 20,000 firefighters and others annually.

“It’s not something to be afraid of,” said Union Pacific CEO Jack Koraleski. He said there isn’t a safer option than rail.

Federal officials who oversee railroads said they’ve responded to the boom in oil trains by beefing up rail car inspections in oil-producing states such as North Dakota. Tougher safety standards are being considered for the tank cars that carry oil.

But the accident records kept by the U.S. Department of Transportation point to the daunting size of that task. Oil trains are now active in virtually every corner of the country, and since 2008, crude releases from rail cars have been reported in 29 states.

The potential for a major accident looms ominously for emergency officials. Urban areas and towns near railroad facilities are better prepared, while rural officials know they may be on their own in the first crucial hours after an accident.

New Castle County, Del., has extensive resources and well-trained firefighters because it is home to an oil refinery and a complex of chemical manufacturing plants.

County emergency management coordinator Dave Carpenter said the industry has worked closely with officials to improve emergency response since an incident in 1984, so he’s not especially concerned about the crude oil shipments.

“We’re probably one of the more-prepared places in the nation,” Carpenter said.

But even in another relatively well-equipped area, like Little Rock, Ark., Pulaski County emergency manager Andy Traffanstedt said he worries that a fiery accident like the one in Quebec could overwhelm firefighters.

“Sometimes things are so catastrophic that you can’t ever get ahead of it,” he said, even though his county has three hazardous materials teams and a Union Pacific rail yard with more resources nearby.

Trains headed west out of the Bakken oil patch in North Dakota snake their way along the Missouri River and slice through towns large and small before crawling over the Continental Divide at Glacier National Park to reach coastal refineries.

Like spokes on a wheel, others head south to the Gulf, east to New York and Pennsylvania, north into Canada.

(Continued on page 2)

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